19 Jan 2013 - Article No: 1659

automated-paydays.com - Work-From-Home Scam

Other Keywords: www.automated-paydays.com, Melanie Pearson

Typical work-from-home scam promoting deceptive misinformation about making money on the Internet. The claims made on this website are absurd and should not be taken as accurate information.




If you're on our site looking for a legitimate way to make money easily, quickly and with little effort, then you're chasing a dream. If it were easy, trust us, we’d be doing it too. There are no 'secret methods', 'proven systems' or 'one click software' apps. There are ways to make money on the Internet, but they take work, time, effort and patience. And you also need to be willing to learn plenty of information. If this sounds good to you, jump over to this section of our site where we explain it and give some recommmendations.
Work-from-home scams like automated-paydays.com are designed purely to fool a reader into thinking that they are signing up for an online job opportunity. The reader is led to believe that they are about to embark on a job, program or system that will allow them to make significant money on the Internet –often much more than one could expect on an average wage. Sites like automated-paydays.com promote themselves in such a way to deliberately fool a victim into believing that the only thing to stand in the way of them earning guaranteed money is paying the signing-up fee.
However, the reality is much different. Sites like automated-paydays.com actually sell rehashed marketing information that is easily obtainable for free elsewhere on the Internet and is generally well known information within the online marketing communities. In other words, you’re being charged for free information under the false assertion it will make you money. The information provided by these sites is rarely sufficient enough to make anyone who signs up any actual money, let alone the huge amounts implied on the websites sales pitch. It is important to realise that sites like automated-paydays.com are everywhere. The scammers behind the schemes create many identical sites, and as soon as one begins to receive too much bad publicity, the site is dropped and an identical site is created in its place.

Work-from-home scams can employ several misleading tactics to deliberately deceive readers, that can include –

- The illusion that the site searches for jobs 'in your area' or is 'checking availability' (often initiated by asking for your address and/or postcode) – The site claims that there are jobs in the readers area to create the illusion that the reader has 'qualified' to join the program.

- The false assertion that this work-from-home opportunity has been featured on various legitimate news outlets, including papers, magazines or TV channels. This may be directly stated or implied by the use of trademarked logos belonging to the media outlets.

- The use of fake news websites to promote the scam. Fake news websites are websites that appear to be a legitimate online media source bit in reality is just a blatant promotional website for the scam. You can read more about fake news websites here.

- Out-of-context news videos from legitimate news outlets may be included on the sales pitch in an attempt to add legitimacy to the scam.

- The illusion that those who sign up will be doing some menial task that will earn them money such as “posting links” or “data entry” – these are gross distortions of the truth. Work-from-home schemes may dress the job up as a “link processor” or something similar, when this is just not accurate at all.

- The use of presenting the reader with a person who is described by the site as a “work-from-home coach” or “specialist”, “consultant” or “expert”. The site will typically tell their story of how they became successful and how you can too. However the character described by the site does not exist and is only used to try and fool potential victims.

- Highlighting the benefits of working from home, such as having no boss, no time wasted in traffic and choosing your own hours. Also highlighting the benefits of making lots of money including pictures of expensive holidays, cars and houses and descriptive, idealistic stories of financial freedom

- Claiming those who sign up only have to work a handful of hours and will still easily make significant money

- Employing fake and unverifiable testimonials

- The false assertion that spaces are limited or discounts are temporary.

- Hidden charges and subscription fees


Typical sales page headers for work-from-home scams.

It is important for people who are looking to make money online realise that there are no systems, methods, programs or jobs like this that can make someone easy money from the Internet. If there was then everybody would do it. Schemes like automated-paydays.com is designed to create the illusion that all a person has to do it sign up, pay the registration fee and start making money. It does not work like that at all. Making money online requires time, talent, patience and persistence. Work-from-home scams like this are so deceiving in their sales pitch, it is unlikely for anyone who make any money with these schemes. The vast majority will fail to recoup their registration fees.

It is possible to make money from the Internet, just not in the guise of an instant ready-made system or job. Internet users can create and build an Internet business, providing they have the right tools, information and personal attributes, and they avoid sites that promote misinformation and hype. In fact, it is entirely possible to make a fantastic wage online. We’re always getting questions regarding the truth about making money online, so we’ve launched a section of our site here that deals with a possible career online and what we recommend for those that are interested. You can jump to that section of our site by clicking here.

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