Costco banning book America: Imagine the World Without Her because it criticizes Obama? - Internet/Facebook Rumour

8 Jul 2014 - Article No: 1862. Filed under: General | Internet/Facebook Rumour




Cosotco. you have dubbed our bible fiction in your stores and now you are removing a book called "America" by DSousa from your shelves. Since you dont like God, the Holy Bible and America we will show you our dislike and boycott you!

collected July 2014

Rumours are flying across the Internet that American retailer Costco is banning the book America: Imagine the World Without Her because it contains conservative, anti-Obama sentiment.

Many spectators have concluded that Costco have banned the book due to board members being close to President Obama. This has led to the social media pages belonging to the American retailer being bombarded with angry messages from shoppers.

It is true that Costco, early in July, made the decision to stop stocking the book, written by Dinesh D’Souza. However, according to statements on the social media pages, this was because of poor sales, and nothing to do with politics.

A statement on their Facebook Page reads –


Costco is not influenced by political considerations in selecting product for sale in our warehouses or on Costco.com. This includes our selection of books. Our book buyers are solely interested in book sales, and do not favor any political persuasion over another. Recently, after deciding to sell the book "America: Imagine the World Without Her", beginning on June 1, a decision was made to pull the book from sale on July 1. This decision was based solely on the number of copies sold during that month, and had nothing to do with the content of the book.

Costco is not a book store. Our book shelf space is very limited. We exercise discipline in the best utilization of that limited space based solely on what our members are buying. We cant carry every title that our members are interested in reading. We are constantly monitoring book sales, and make decisions to pull books off the shelves frequently based on sales volume to make room for other titles. Politics or controversy over content do not influence our decisions.

After we made the return, a documentary was released about the book. Since then there has been heightened interest by our membership base and brisk sales at locations still in stock. Therefore, we have made the decision to reorder the book.


According to the above statement, given the heightened interested of the book because of the impending release of a movie with the same name, they have opted to re-order the book into their stores.

Whilst Costco have claimed the decision to remove the book had nothing to do with politics and everything to do with them not being a bookstore and thus having limited shelving space, many spectators have claimed that the retailer was lying and Costco did indeed remove the book because of its right-wing political content.

However these are accusations and there is currently no actual evidence to support them. Many have questioned that if this were true then why Costco would have stocked the book in the first place.

Perhaps inevitably this has also led to many starting various boycott campaigns across social media, something retailers and social media websites have a long history in.

Facebook was used as a primary tool last year to boycott Walmart during the Black Friday period because of poor staff wages. Sams Club has also seen its fair share of Pages dedicated to persuading buyers to go elsewhere, as indeed has almost every other major retailer across the world.

Whatever the truth is in this case, this debacle has sparked many spin-off rumours that Costco are removing any stock that has anything to do with the United States, including flags and anything pertaining to the Star Spangled Banner. However these rumours are baseless and untrue.

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